Client Feedback Tool
  • Selling a Client Experience Strategy to Your Boss

    Posted on May 22nd, 2016 Terry Reynolds 2 comments

    It is all about increasing or decreasing.  Increasing revenue and/or decreasing costs.  Using a CX strategy to improve sales and/or decrease marketing costs. Leaders must tie CX to business results.

    Everyone wants to have the best experiences for their clients.  Some even feel that driving up their overall client satisfaction score (sometimes at all costs) is a competitive edge.  Innovative leaders understand that approach is too vague and not measureable in their world of “increasing and decreasing.” Clarity on if they love you or even what in particular they love about you will interest your executives but, they may not fund your CX initiative budget. A visionary CX strategist will tie specific business results (the ones the CEO consistently mutters about in the hallway) to her program.  Moving past tracking to a higher client satisfaction score and demonstrating how it will improve the organization’s “increasing and decreasing” will win in your next budget cycle.Terry 5.23.16

    For professional services firms an easy example of cost savings is reducing client churn. Improving the retention of your current client base saves the cost of marketing and acquiring the replacement for revenue lost. A funny thing about improving the client experience for existing clients, they spend more.  Now you have something on the “increasing” side of this equation.

    It’s not all about the client retention.  Most of our employees are technical experts in their respective practices.  They are problem solvers at their very core and want nothing more than to delight the client representatives they engage with.  Deploying a system that significantly improves a client experience improves the opportunity to delight the client and fulfill your employees.  Fulfilled happy employees stay and are 12% more productive (Anchor-The Happiness Advantage.)  To replace a mid-level employee the cost can be upwards of 150% of their annual salary. For high-level specialized employees the cost can rise to nearly 400% of their salary. Do a little math and you’ll help your executives understand how increasing employee retention will help in decreasing significant organizational costs.

    Every firm is different in what is most important in the “increasing and decreasing” game.  Find out what business results were in your last strategic plan and directly map them your CX strategy outcomes.

  • Ten Things I Learned in 2015

    Posted on November 24th, 2015 Ryan Suydam No comments
    Ten Things I Learned in 2015

    I’ve spent the year attending many of the best conferences in the industry, traveling alongside a few of the savviest business consultants, and working with many of the most forward-thinking professional services firms in the world. We’ve shared books, ideas, and other resources with each other.  It’s December, and my brain is full!

    Before I re-calibrate over the holidays and gear up for another new year of learning in 2016, I wanted to pause and reflect on the best of the best ideas I encountered in 2015. These ideas all went beyond AHA! moments and became integral pieces of how I operate. In short, these are the ideas that stuck, that changed my perception, and affected my behavior.

    Perhaps you’ve been too busy this year to get the professional development you wanted. Perhaps you’re just curious. Either way – I’m sharing my curated list, the best of the best, the things that rose to the top.

    In no particular order, here are ten things I learned this year I thought worth sharing:

    1. There Is No Hope! Darren Smith at Cima Strategic taught me to stop hoping for a project to end well. Instead, put processes in place to KNOW that it will end well. His goal: Have a “best project experience ever” – on every project. I have focused on understanding ideal outcomes from the beginning, and driving towards those more consistently.
    2. Precise Questions Matter. Bob Stocking at Vervago revealed the necessity of asking the right questions, precisely. A few simple techniques can keep even a talker like myself focused on listening with purpose. I have put into practice skills that are both more efficient and effective than the “old way” – leading to deeper conversations and more success in both sales and services delivery.
    3. Social Status is a Matter of Survival. Michelle Brown at Sentis shares how perceived social threats affect our neurochemistry, triggering base instincts and reactions rooted in the origins of humankind as a species. Becoming aware of these triggers, I have been able to re-wire my brain to handle criticism and negativity without the anxiety of before.
    4. Don’t Reject Myself. Jia Jiang at WuJu Learning, revealed how we’re so hardwired to avoid rejection, we will often reject ourselves before we allow others to reject us. Jia’s practical exercises have helped me be bolder, get over myself, and ask for more in life – and getting it.
    5. Clients Don’t Buy Me. Tim Asimos at circle S studio highlights how clients want their problems solved. I will never be an aspiration purchase, I will only be a practical part of a solution. I have begun to focus more on sharing relevant content that solves problems – and the work has followed.
    6. Communication Reduces Risk. Tim Corbett of SmartRisk presented evidence that firms that communicate effectively have a greater probability of being a “high performing firm.” These high performing firms realize dramatically increased profits and both reduced liability and liability premiums. I have begun re-engineering our services delivery process to increase the quality and frequency of client communication to drive better results.
    7. Client Journey Maps are Magic. Tania Salarvand at Valeocon showed me how to create a visual diagram that maps every step of a client interaction. Seeing all the exchanges and touch points enabled me to streamline our own client journey, launched a reorganization of our team to deliver accordingly.
    8. Client Delighters Drive Growth. Terry Reynolds at Kleinfelder shared a story of shopping at three stores one of which stood out. They surprised him with a unique approach that created real delight. It also created a new client and a sale. Terry’s experience encouraged me to look for delighters that we can insert into our processes every day.
    9. 21st Century Businesses Must be Frictionless.  Geoff Colvin at Fortune Magazine discusses the concept of “frictionless” businesses – new ways of doing old things that simplify processes – taking all the bumps out of the path. Uber revolutionized the transportation market – and continues to threaten many other established businesses. Uber works because it’s EASY for the consumer. Every week at our weekly team meeting we now discuss where our clients see friction points, and discuss ways to remove the friction.
    10. Build a Habit Forming Business. Nir Eyal from Nir and Far reveals the four step process every game-changing application employs. In a decade, Facebook grew from nothing to actively engaging 20% of the world’s people on a daily basis – ever wonder how? I have taken the core insights from Nir’s research and begun to shape both our services and our products accordingly. Our clients succeed when they develop habits of engaging with us, and we succeed when they keep coming back for more.

    I certainly learned more than these ten things – but these are the concepts, ideas, and best practices that have actually caused me to change how I approach business, leadership, and the future.

    What are the concepts you have put into practice in 2015? If you’re not already registered, join us on December 15th for a complementary webinar and share your ideas (so I know what to work on next year).

  • Are You Okay? I Was Worried About You.

    Posted on November 19th, 2015 Ryan Suydam No comments

    Are You Okay? I Was Worried About You.

    That’s the first thing I heard from the receptionist at the dentist this morning. I had placed the appointment on my calendar an hour later than scheduled, and missed the visit.

    Rather than show any frustration at how I messed up the schedule (it was a big visit), the receptionist’s first reaction was concern for me. You see, it was raining quite hard this morning. She knows I have a 30-mile commute. And her reaction to my lateness was one of care and concern – about me.

    I’m sure my mistake caused problems. At the very least, they provided a dentist for two hours, and now he would not be billing those hours. We had to reschedule a visit for a few weeks out, so now they can’t sell those hours to someone else. Who knows what other challenges I inconvenienced them with.

    Faced with a client who showed up an hour late to a meeting (or missed it altogether), many of us would sigh, or acknowledge the extra work we have to do now. Many of us would take another tack, and put on a good face: “Oh, no problem at all! We had a REALLY busy day here too, so it’s really quite convenient of you to reschedule. Actually, it helps us out a lot.” I’ve done that many times myself.

    But I’ve never had a person in business say “Are you okay? I was worried about you.”

    I’ve used the two unexpected hours of free time to ponder this mind shift, one where our bias is to care and to genuinely be concerned for our clients. Those two simple sentences humbled me immediately. Here I am, a professional who helps other professionals elevate their care for clients. And yet, would I have ever gone so far as this – SHOWING a client I care more about their wellbeing than my schedule?

    The lesson is clear, but the application of the lesson less so. I appeal to you, readers, to contribute stories from your experience in business. When have you seen compassion like this in business? By citing example, perhaps we can all begin modeling transformational, differentiating care to our clients.

  • Blunt Proposal versus Positive Proposal

    Posted on August 13th, 2015 Mike Phillips No comments
    Blunt Proposal versus Positive Proposal

    I know, I’m the guy who’s always talking about why you should track your clients’ perceptions. But here’s a story I think might sound familiar. Its about a mistake we made that is probably too often made by other firms during the creation of a proposal. And, I hope it will help you from making the same mistake.

    Our firm had been building a relationship with a new prospective client for a while. We had spent time with them. We had asked questions to understand what their goals and needs really are. They had shared their concerns and challenges with us and we had guided them through how we collaborate with them to work through the challenges and to achieve their goals. We had stressed how we really cared about helping them. When we were ready to submit our proposal, our firm and the client felt confident we could help them have a positive outcome.

    Besides our submittal, the client wanted to see a proposal from the General Contractor who would work with us. So, we sat down with the General Contractor and went through everything. At the end of the meeting, I felt good about the fact we were all on the same page. They said they understood what was needed. They would be extremely helpful and would help our mutual client achieve their goals. So we asked them to preview their proposal to our client.

    I couldn’t believe it when I saw their proposal.Client Centered Focus

    What they sent us was a long list of prices for services included in the project and a very long list of what was not included. There was nothing about their understanding of the project and how they could help. It basically described the deliverables they would produce, instead of the help they would provide. Clients are hiring us to create deliverables, those are just means to an end. It is the end result they need from us. Instead of telling the client how collaborative they would be, their proposal was all about them and what they would and wouldn’t do.

    I called them and said we needed to talk. We needed to get our proposals better aligned and more focused on the client and their needs. I pulled out our proposal so I could show them what we were looking for the proposals to convey. When I looked at our proposal all I could say was, “I can’t believe it, we made the same mistake!

    It’s so easy to stay in our own heads, to look at our proposal more from our perspective than the client’s. We just do things the way we’ve always done them instead of looking at what we are intending to offer our clients. We don’t mean to. We really care about helping them achieve their goals. Our plan is to be collaborative with them. 

    But how often does the proposal they get from us say just the opposite?

    Communication can get off track with no one meaning for that to happen. That is why I believe it is so important to continue to track our clients’ perceptions over time. 

    Our research shows that the #1 thing clients want from us is an effective relationship. And what that means to them is meaningful communication and responsiveness. I didn’t say frequent communication. I said meaningful. There is a difference. At least from our clients’ perspective.

    Getting too focused on our processes happens to all of us. We get busy. The question is, do our processes let us hear from our clients in a meaningful way? A way to track that our project delivery process works for them? At Phillips, we understand that even though we communicate with our clients regularly, using a process that tracks their perceptions of that process and gives them an easy way to let us know if they would like any changes, is critical because we are so busy.

    I wanted to tell this story on myself because I think it is so important. I suspect something similar has happened to some or all of you as well.

    Download this complimentary webinar “Build Client Loyalty and Avoid Surprises”. In the webinar I’ll share how to identify each of your clients’ hot buttons. And how to tell immediately if they change. It’s easy to ensure you are always meeting or exceeding your clients’ expectations and I need not tell you of the obvious benefits that will have for your firm.

    Mike Phillips AIA, is a national speaker on the topic of building client loyalty through aligning with client perceptions. He has spoken numerous times for PSMJ, Zweig White, ROG, ACEC, and AIA. He has also been published in PSMJ and AEMA journals. Mike has been running a successful architectural firm for more than 30 years. He understands the impact on marketing, staff retention, performance, and profitability when you don’t know what your clients are thinking.

  • ‘Aha!’ Moments (and how they change everything)

    Posted on March 25th, 2015 Ryan Suydam No comments
    'Aha!' Moments (and how they change everything)

    Oh. I bet this guy learned a lesson he’ll never forget.

    Duh learning moment

    It was one of those ‘Aha!’ moments when the light bulb goes on and your thinking and behavior change forever. He’ll never go back to a square wheel again. He’ll never wake up one day and haul a woolly mammoth across the steppes and realize he put the wrong wheel on today.

    Not all learning sticks like that.

    I am bombarded with opportunities to learn. Most of what I learn goes in, and right back out. Some ideas are important enough I capture them as an action item. “Go to the gym” might be one of those. Something important that I want to do, but I have to act upon the item to make the change. Many times, the change never happens. It’s too much work.

    Then I have moments that change the way I think. When I see a situation differently. When I realize I can’t go back and un-know what was learned. More than knowing, this type of moment changes behavior – automatically. These moments don’t happen often, and they are real game-changers.

    I help professional services firms uncover ‘Aha!’ moments with their clients, and within their firms, that allow them to drive greater success and satisfaction just because they know. I reviewed the report below with one of our clients. To help you see the ‘Aha! moment’, let me share information about how to read this data.

    • The scale on the right is used when a clients responds to a feedback request. The scale centers automatically at Met Expectations, driving clients to intentionally move the slider up or down to change the score.
    • The chart on the left, the black bar indicates the average score (by Project Manager). The dark blue represents the scores in the 25% – 75% range. The light blue shows the minimum or maximum scores.

    Duh Moments graphic 2

    When reviewing this chart, I focused on two project managers, Chris and Dan. Both were, at a minimum, meeting their clients’ needs. Most of Chris’ scores were in the Excellent to Exceptional range. Dan’s scores were between Met Expectations and Exceeded Expectations. Some may think that Chris is the better project manager. After all – he’s at the top of the chart! But, when I asked one question, we found an ‘Aha!’ moment.

    “What is the difference in their project profitability?”

    Chris’ projects average 3% profitability. Dan’s average 38%. Chris was chronically over-delivering on his projects and not charging for services out of scope. Dan, on the other hand, has a very clear sense of what his clients’ value and he prices his services accordingly.

    We showed this to Chris. He had an ‘Aha!’ moment. He realized his clients value the work he does for them. He stopped doing things they didn’t care about and started charging appropriately for services out of scope. Understanding what his clients were telling him changed everything.

    The rest of the story…

    When we checked back six months later, Chris’ project profitability had already taken a healthy upturn (up to 18%). And his feedback scores, while lower, still were near the top of the pack.

    One simple ‘Aha!’ moment changed everything for Chris. Not only was he earning his keep with the shareholders, but he felt validated by his clients, and continued to deliver a high-value proposition to them. What an easy win/win/win story.

    Interested in hearing more about stories like Chris’s – and how you can discover your own stories to drive success both within your firm and with your clients?

    Download The Power of Storytelling for Your Firm – a 90-minute Webinar outlining the importance of storytelling, methods for gathering stories, tips for using stories internally to improve staff and culture, and best practices for using stories externally in marketing, business development, and project delivery.

    I’ll wager you have an ‘Aha!’ moment by the end. What are you waiting for?

     

  • Avoid Commoditization – Tell A Story

    Posted on February 24th, 2015 Sally Orcutt No comments
    Avoid Commoditization - Tell A Story

    It’s not what you do – it is the experience you provide.

    When was the last time you attended an industry meeting that did NOT highlight the plight of commoditization?

    Dictionary.com defines the word:  “almost total lack of meaningful differentiation in the goods (or services) provided“.

    So how do you avoid commoditization and differentiate your firm? What can you do to stand out from your peers?

    Beyond all the marketing tricks and branding exercises, real differentiation happens at the experiential level. It’s not what you do for your clients, but rather how you do it.

    We know quality service when we see or feel it. When you share stories about times you received excellent service, do you talk about what they did? Or how it felt? Remembering that excellent hotel stay – you describe it as “inviting” the staff as “friendly” and the bed as “comfortable.” None of these words are objective features – they are subjective experiences you perceived.

    Your clients are people just like you. When they talk about your firm, they are not saying “Wow, ACME Engineering really got the sewer pipes to line up perfectly”. They are saying “Wow, ACME Engineering took really good care of us. They understood why we needed to complete this phase of the project on a fast track and they made it happen. There helped us manage the scope, anticipate challenges, and solve construction problems. They were easy to get hold of and followed up on any questions we had really quickly”.

    There is the ‘meaningful difference’. When you understand the story behind the project, you are more than ‘the firm that put the pipes in the ground’. You are the firm that cared enough to really grasp what was important to your client. You are the firm who took care of them.

    Without understanding the story your clients tell, the project risks becoming internally focused on your goals rather than the client’s goals. With the story, you are a part of the vision, and your client’s goals become your goals. With the story, you are aligned. You are partners.

    Download “The Power of Storytelling for Your Firm”, a 90-minute Webinar from Client Feedback Tool co-founder Ryan Suydam. Ryan outlines the importance of storytelling, methods for gathering stories, tips for using stories internally to improve staff and culture, and best practices for using stories externally in marketing, business development, and project delivery.

     

  • How Can I Turn my Project Managers Into Business Developers?

    Posted on January 28th, 2015 Ryan Suydam No comments
    How Can I Turn my Project Managers Into Business Developers?

    What an age old question. How do we create an organizational mindset among technical staff to be business developers? How do we support them, and hold them accountable? Tough questions no doubt – but a solution may be easier than you think.

    In a professional SERVICES company, the service you provide – the experience your clients have – is your brand. There is no better marketing and selling activity than taking great care of clients. If you’re like most of the industry, 85% or more of your work is from repeat clients.

    Managing expectations (asking for feedback) is a logical starting point. Anyone can do it (yes, even an engineer!). We started our company out of an architecture firm, and designed our processes and tools specifically for project managers. No one has more influence over client retention than the front-line staff. When project managers ask the right questions, at the right times, and take action on the information – each client feels valued and important.

    More critically, each client will recognize the project manager as his expert. When a client latches onto one of your PM’s as the expert, the client is much more likely to tell others about what a great expert he has. After all, the client helped create that expert by giving feedback. Word gets around, and suddenly people are asking how they can get access to the expert. Your project managers become business developers without even trying.

    Some people are never going to go out and use traditional “sales” techniques to find and develop new relationships. The “become an expert” approach not only makes these often introverted technical people feel great about their work, but it’s a natural way for them to develop existing and new business based on relationship and referrals.

    Consider this scenario:

    One of your strongest project managers has been working with a great client for a couple years. They know each other well, the work is going smoothly, and there’s no sign of trouble. Momentum keeps the relationship going with little investment, and everyone is complacent about the status quo.

    Now, introduce a dose of feedback. With a Client Feedback Tool survey, the project managers asks the client how an active project is progressing. The client responds, and raves about the work. We knew they would – it’s a good relationship. We confirmed our assumptions. But… we now have evidence that we are creating real value.

    As soon as the client responds, the response is sent to the project manager. Based on the positive results, the project manager, who would have no other “reason” to call the client, can do so. He’s following-up to thank the client for the feedback; he acknowledges that he also finds the relationship positive and valuable. And while they’re talking about successes, the project manager naturally asks the question: “Do you know anyone else we could help like this?”

    Seeking out new business opportunities is no longer an awkward call that a project manager dreads.  It’s a natural extension to an easy and positive conversation. And it comes with a built in recommendation!

    The objective of any feedback program, especially one powered primarily through electronic methods, is to initiate conversations with clients. When a client responds, don’t delay – follow-up and keep a conversation going. Celebrate successes or address challenges right away. Use the phone, meetings, and other existing communication tools to do so. When a client doesn’t respond, follow-up! Use that as a great opportunity to check in and verify they got the feedback request, and assure everything is going well.

    For many of us, starting the conversation is the hardest part. And starting conversations is really what business development is.

    How do you make project managers better business developers? Give them an easy process to start the conversations, and the insights they need to do a great job for their clients.

    You’ll have better clients (and more of them), happier project managers, and a better firm because of it.

  • Getting Started with a Feedback Initiative

    Posted on May 6th, 2009 Ryan Suydam No comments
    Getting Started with a Feedback Initiative

    Regardless of how you collect feedback – almost everyone agrees it is important to do so.  Organizing your client feedback efforts into a systematic approach will ensure that you actually get the results you need.

    The WickerPark Group, which focuses on client service interviews and client growth programs in the legal industry, authors a great blog, and a recent post highlights some good advice for getting started on a feedback regimen:

    The success of client feedback programs requires leadership buy in and top down support. When asking for feedback and opinions from clients, the firm is making a promise that it will respond to the feedback – both good and bad.

    Effective feedback doesn’t just happen – like anything else it takes some effort, guided by a purpose, to maximize the potential benefits.  When the impetus for improving client relationships through feedback comes from the top, with support down the command chain, the results can be quick and extraordinary.

    Each client requires a different service strategy.

    This simple statement captures the entire essence of why feedback is critical.  Every client is a little bit different – and each person you interact with has his or her own set of personal preferences, needs, cares, concerns, and personalities.

    Your process might be great in general, but needs subtle tweaking to maximize the relationship potential for each interaction.  Helping your staff understand this, and that feedback during the project is the only way to identify adjustments, will drive use of any feedback systems you put in place.

    Is the firm willing to respond to the feedback and take action? How?

    This may seem like an obvious question, but the answer will decide your success with a feedback program.  Prompt, effective, and helpful follow-up, focused on the client who gave you feedback, will create new opportunities and positive relationships.  When those engaging in feedback activities begin to see these results, they will naturally tend to continue collecting feedback.

    From the very beginning, start with the end in mind – the goal of getting feedback is to follow-up with a response to the benefit of the client.  Start off with great responses, and your feedback program will grow quickly and sustainably.

  • Feedback About Me is Really About You…

    Posted on April 30th, 2009 Ryan Suydam No comments
    Feedback About Me is Really About You...

    We’ve spent over five years focused on feedback, and along the way, we’ve participated in every feedback program we come across.  We’ve taken every survey, fielded every call, and attended interviews.  In almost every case, the same mistake is made.  The feedback I’m giving to you, shouldn’t be about you – it should be about me.

    Let me say it again:

    When you ask me for feedback, the focus should be me.

    The most common mistake we see in feedback programs is that the person asking for feedback mistakenly acts as though HE is more important than the client he’s surveying.   The feedback programs are very ego-centric, rather than client-focused.

    Feedback requests should be primarily for the benefit of the person giving feedback.  If there’s nothing in it for them, you won’t get much feedback, and what you do get will not be of good quality.  You also miss a HUGE opportunity to build lasting loyalty and commitment from your client.

    So, how does one ask for feedback for the benefit of the person you’re asking?

    1. Keep it SHORT. You are taking time from your clients when you ask for feedback.  Show them that you respect their time by not wasting any.  Ask only what you need.  If some feedback collected suggests further attention is required, THEN you can take some more time to discover and respond.  Ask no more than 5-7 questions.  Take no more than 2 minutes.  Respect their time as if it’s your own.
    2. Don’t wait until the END. If you collect feedback at the end of a project / service, how is the client helped?  Get feedback EARLY and OFTEN, before the work is done.  The client will know you have a chance to respond, adjust, and deliver the final product in a better way, before it’s too late.
    3. Stay FOCUSED. Their feedback tells you about their needs and expectations – so ask questions that bring this to light.  Avoid questions to which the answer gives them no benefit.  “How do I compare to competitor XYZ” would be a good example of a bad question.  There’s no way to answer in a way that helps me.  Questions such as “How did my responsiveness match your expectations?” lets the client provide course correction – or praise – so you can adjust your responsiveness to a more fitting style, customized for that client.
    4. Follow Up. If you ask, and they respond, do something about it.  Let them know how their feedback is going to help you help them.  Responding in a way that returns immediate results will create an ecosystem of constant feedback, adjustment, communication – and long term loyalty.

    “So what about me?” you may be asking.  That’s where a system for collecting feedback becomes critical.  Collect feedback in a consistent way, in short doses – but get a LOT of it.  Over time you will build a vast history of performance and effectiveness, from which you can glean countless insights into you, your staff, and your company.

    If you want to be client-focused, be sure your client feedback sends the same message!

  • The Best Questions to Ask – Deliverables and Relationships

    Posted on April 17th, 2009 Mike Phillips 2 comments
    The Best Questions to Ask - Deliverables and Relationships
    The most effective type of client feedback covers a wide variety of issues related to the efforts that a professional services firm makes for their clients. In order to be useful, the feedback must also accurately capture the clients’ perception of how the service-providing firm performed relative to the client expectations. This is a critical aspect for feedback to be able to help a firm understand their client and how to quickly create the maximum value. If the firm did not meet the expectations of their client, a problem is created that if unnoticed and left unattended, can fester into a major issue or a liability insurance claim. With the typical cost of claims at over $300,000 /year and each claim averaging about 3 years duration, that’s a million dollar misunderstanding.

    However, whether the firm exceeded the client’s expectations or not, effective feedback will contain sufficient specifics to allow the firm to understand exactly what the client either appreciated or objected to. In surveying clients for their feedback, we have found that the shorter and simpler the survey, the greater number of surveys are returned with feedback. Our research has shown that a survey that takes more than a few minutes to complete will be abandoned by 95% of people.

     

    The ultimate challenge of gathering effective feedback is to make the survey very comprehensive while also being very concise. Over the years, we have distilled the survey questions to a grand total of six. In order for only six questions to cover a wide gamut of client service issues we divided the topics covered into two main categories: Deliverables and Relationships. “Deliverables” inventory the client’s perceptions on WHAT the design firm produced. “Relationships” questions collect feedback on HOW the firm’s process worked. Deliverable questions focus on things while relationship questions focus on people.

     

    The key factors regarding the Deliverables include how well the design firm’s products:
    • Attended to the Schedule goals of the project
    • Addressed the Budget parameters of the project
    • Included the appropriate Accuracy required to be effective
    The key factors regarding the Relationships include how well the design staff’s process:
    • Offered the Helpfulness needed by the client
    • Included the Responsiveness desired by the client
    • Contained the level of Quality sought by the client
    This breakdown of categories was honed to produce the most constructive feedback for professional service firms while also allowing clients the opportunity to offer succinct but satisfying feedback in order to produce the most successful project. While the firm gets full credit for being proactive and professional in asking for feedback, the client becomes more involved and engaged in the project and therefore feels more ownership in the outcome.

    A survey tool that includes one question in each of the above six categories, particularly if the survey uses our specialized process-oriented question format and detailed numeric answer slider can collect valuable, objective, actionable feedback for a professional services firm in only two minutes of a client’s day.